The Diversity of Privilege

This week my family and I traveled down south from Wisconsin to Louisiana, specifically New Orleans. We originally had difficulty figuring out where exactly we could go considering we are a mixed family. My sister, who is white, suggested we go to Alabama. My father and I, both people of color, became anxious at the thought of traveling  down there. My mother, who is also white, put out the idea of Virginia, which I immediately shot down. What with all the rallies and white supremacists around? We found it hard to set our hearts on a place that was safe, and that everyone in our family wanted to go to. Eventually someone threw out the idea of New Orleans which we all decided was a great idea, safe for everyone, and had activities and attractions we all wanted to witness, and experience.

While in New Orleans I noticed many things that were different compared to our small town in Wisconsin. Besides the obvious things including: different weather, accents and drawls, and how hectic the city was, I found that I almost felt safer, a sense of more normalcy.

In my small hometown it was very stereotypical–lots of people knew each other, people who lived there now had grown up there when they were children, very religious, and also very white–Down here in Louisiana it was so diverse! White people, Black people, Hispanic people, Asian people, and everything in between.

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Walking down in the French Quarters going from shop to shop I heard at least five languages, I saw people singing to one another and same-sex couples comfortable enough to hold hands and kiss in public, something I rarely saw back home. Everything there was just so diverse, from the culture to the people. Architecture, food, people, and places, everything was different.

You know how in some towns they have city flags on their lampposts, or state flags on them? Well, in New Orleans, they have gay pride flags on their lampposts. Talk about taking steps forward!

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But, these differences weren’t all good. In some parts of the city it’s the nicest thing you’ll ever see. Beautiful houses bigger than some churches I’ve seen. Rich neighborhoods filled with mansions that had gates and intercoms, and then one street down, the next block over, was filled with houses that had trash in their lawns and boards on their walls so that there wasn’t a hole from the outside to their living room.

 

 

So few of them had window air conditioners, and in this heat it seemed vital to a Northerner like me, but when they did they had cage type things over them so they wouldn’t get stolen. People stood out on their porches with as little clothes on as possible to escape the heat, because at least there was wind outside to combat against the blinding sun and horrible humidity. Another thing that struck me was the amount of homeless people. People who had signs begging for food, people who had dogs with them or who were overheating because of the sun. There were moments in which we passed people that were either asleep or had fainted, or fallen over sick. I could never quite tell which it was.

One thing that was impossible to go unnoticed, yet easy to be put aside for many, was the fact that the rich neighborhoods by the French Quarters and the above ground cemetery where people toured, it was near all white people. And the poor neighborhoods with small, tore apart houses, was all black folk or people of color in general. I’m not gonna lie, there was an occasional black person or family in the rich parts, or maybe one or two white people in the more poor, broken down neighborhoods, but it was still mostly black and white.

This struck me hard because when I really sit down and think about it, even if I do have disadvantages because of my skin or my health or past, I have an amazing life. I have a good education, my family is mid middle class, and we are a family. We have a roof above our heads and food on our plates. We don’t have to put a locked cage around our window air conditioners to make sure it doesn’t get stolen. We don’t have to lock our door at night in case someone tries to break it, even if we do lock it anyways. Though I do endure disadvantages, I have so much privilege that I rarely acknowledge. I have a tenancy to tell people, “Everyone has at least a smidgen of privilege, so accept yours and use it to the best of your abilities.” And after being reintroduced to these types of places and how hard it is for some people, I think I need to take a step back and listen to my own advice.

One day we took a wrong turn and ended up in a poor neighborhood. It was filled with people sitting outside of their houses, the places they slept in wrecked as though it hadn’t been lived in for years and years. When we were in this neighborhood my mom had told my dad, who was driving, “Hurry and get us out of here, this place is scary.” To which I replied, “No, not scary. Just sad.”

Things you can do to help folks in your hometown who need it are simple for most. You can volunteer at soup kitchens or donate food. If you have leftovers you can give them to homeless people outside who need it. Many people don’t give money to homeless folks because of many reasons, so give them food, water, or clothes. Help them get into a homeless shelter or get a job if they don’t have one. If someone who is homeless approaches or passes you, don’t be fearful, be inspired to help. You can easily find numbers for homeless shelters by doing a little bit of research.

Remember, a little can go a long way.

Clout Club Global: The Next Generation of Street wear

 

 

Recently millennials have experimented bringing forth new and old styles to be worn as a form of expression. Expression and individuality is what sets this generation so far apart, prompting those both awe-less, and bold, to leave their mark and set the newest trends. For the next generation, fashion has become a reputable language, that is spoken by many but only executed by few. A bar set by celebrities, and designers of the most noted collections, has been reset by a young entrepreneur that goes by the name “SauceBoy Cam” with his solo brand Clout Club Global.

 

Designer and Self inspired creator Cameron Garnigan has introduced CLOUT to the world of street wear. Only 18, He is single-handedly responsible for an interesting brand that has surpassed the quo of t-shirts. Not so new to the city of Cartersville, Cameron began his creations Fall of 2015, quickly becoming popular and publicly promoted by his friends and family.  (instagram.com/sauceboycam)

 

 

His brand includes a variety of T-shirts, and a growing list of other products such as Windbreakers and fanny packs. Garnigan calls experimenting with new products “refreshing”. He reveals that in the future for Clout Club Global, he will have a fall collection with “…hoodies, crewnecks and a few new pieces coming.”

 

“My favorite would have to be the fanny pack. It was a different experience, it wasn’t like making the t-shirts, which is my specialty.” (instagram.com/cloutclubglobal)

 

 

In an exclusive interview Cameron opens up about his process, experiences, pros, and cons.

“Honestly the process is very strange. I have flash drives full of designs and there are times, though, that I make a design and use it right away. I’ve done that twice but no one has seen the NEW Clout Club designs.” “I release them out-of-order just based off what mood I’m in.” (Garnigan) Using Adobe Illustrator, Cameron hand crafts his designs and if you pay close enough attention, he tests them online and on social media to get feedback, but often the finished product is unexpected, original and one of a kind.

In entrepreneurship there are lots of pros and cons, unseen to consumers of what the brand has to offer. “Your business is a reflection of you”, Garnigan enjoys the free schedule of his own business. “You get to choose when you want to work and no one can tell you what to do.” (Garnigan) And with ups, there are definitely downs such as marketing aspects, costs, and promotions. It isn’t all easy to get people to buy something that you create. Like owning a lemonade stand, some people just aren’t thirsty or they left their coin purse back at home. “Since this is a solo business of mine, everything comes out-of-pocket and the promo and marketing is the main factor of any business. Basically the main struggle is getting people to shop with you.” (Garnigan) “I’ve been dropping all my old work to get everyone on board.”

You wouldn’t believe the struggle of getting people to shop, from the amount of social media posts and reviews on his most popular product, The Clout Club Rose Tees.

Instagram.com/cloutclubglobal
Instagram.com/cloutclubglobal

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Owning this original Tee from Sauce has become a social norm in the city of Cartersville. Everywhere you turn you see an array of colors and designs, but no matter what color you just can’t miss a Rose logo or the famous brand name printed on the front.

CLOUT CLUB ORIGINALS

(instagram.com/cloutclubglobal)
(instagram.com/cloutclubglobal)

Garnigan describes working with Clout Club as a learning experience, “I feel as if I am learning as the days go by.” As seen by the released products above, one can tell just how limitless the creativity can be. “There is no one way to do something, and that is where I am; learning and studying endless possibilities.” (Garnigan)

The interview wrapped with Cameron’s final thoughts, advice, and next steps.

“Next I personally plan on dropping all my best work, I also plan on doing more sewing projects too, and getting into denim (pants, jackets, and even alterations).” (Garnigan) These next steps definitely sound like success.

Advice from the man behind Clout Club Global is to “Be strong hearted. The whole game isn’t for the weak. Really chase your dreams, no exceptions, do not skip steps and to trust the process.” (Garnigan) With these steps for reaching your goals, and the drive, artistic advantage, and heart of a next generation youth, achieving anything is a piece of cake. Clout Club is more than just shirts, windbreakers, and fanny packs. It’s a brand, a brand that I am proud to see grow, and that I have even bought into a few times. I am very impressed by Cameron and I have been so glad to see CCG grow into something big. I am more than excited for the future.

 

 

Al Gore’s New Film Brings “Truth to Power”

An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power

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Al Gore at Sundance Film Festival. (Photo Courtesy of Getty Images)

A decade after Al Gore’s empowering and eye-opening film and book, An Inconvenient Truth, Former Vice President Gore has brought a new inspiring movie that reminds us of our responsibility to the climate movement. The sequel reviews the changes in both policy and climate, that have shaped the world.

The film exposes the rapid changes that are occurring in the Arctic with a spotlight on the glacial melt in Greenland. Footage shows Gore exploring the quickly melting glacial ice and the colossal chunks of glacier crashing into the ocean. He suggests that due to unusually high temperatures in Greenland, the glaciers are responding. Following the drastic chain of effects that follow sea level rise, the film focuses on flooding events that have ruined cities. After giving the viewer a background on the effects of climate change, Gore calls for the response that is essential to stopping this crisis.

Highlighting Gore’s Climate Reality Leadership Training, the film calls for more activism and involvement to drive the climate movement. In the Leadership Corps program, Al Gore personally trains the potential leaders to encourage change in local community and  to bring the “Truth to Power”. With the program, people can apply to become apart of the Leadership Corps and commit to overcoming the climate crisis.

The coined term “Truth to Power” is now a forceful push in action that stands for change and revolution. Gore proves that through defiance, persistence and charged persuasion, the goals needed to make a difference are achievable. Though faced by many challenges, the climate movement has fought against every opposition and stood strong after every downfall. He brings hope and is determined that we can continue to lead our efforts into the future; despite Trump’s radical agenda. Gore connects the Climate Movement to the many influential movements that have shaped our world such as the Civil Rights Movement, Gay Rights Movement, Women’s Suffrage Movement, and Anti-Apartheid Movement. Each of these oppressed movements were confronted by many threats but continued to develop and achieve ambitious progress.

After a long and burdensome road to ratifying the Paris Agreement, President Trump announced on June 1, 2017 that the United States would be withdrawing from the Paris Agreement. A huge setback to the goals ratified, the withdrawal would ruin the dynamic formed in the agreement and would override the changes endured in other countries. While addressing this announcement, Gore remains hopeful that the strength of the movement is more powerful than the actions of the President.

Closing with the motivating message, “Fight like your world depends on it”, the film leaves viewers with an intense desire to make the changes laid out in the film. Overall the sequel was a perfect combination of recalling the growth of our past while reminding viewers of the obstacles that still lay ahead. The film should be used as proof of the glorious outcomes of unity, determination, and grit.

To join the Climate Reality Project proceed to the project website to bring “Truth to Power”.

Watch the trailer to this inspiring sequel here.

 

The Hate U Give Book Review

FEATURED IMAGE COURTESY OF AMAZON.COM 

 

Damn. My first thought as I delved into the book I got whilst shopping with friends.

The Hate U Give

T     H      U  G     Thug.

This book, written by Angie Thomas, was the best book I’ve read-maybe in my entire life. Besides the fact that this book was incredibly written, has great wording and descriptions, plus makes real connections with the emotions that the main character feels, this book will make you feel things, I can promise you that. This book should make you want to get up and scream for justice!

THUG follows 16-year-old Starr Carter as she struggles to keep her two lives separate. Her life in Garden Heights, her ‘black’ neighbourhood, and her life at Williamson, the, mainly white, private school she goes to. She finds herself at a party with her friend, who she hasn’t spoken to in months, Khalil Harris. When cops try to break up the party, Khalil says he’ll drive her out of there, and they never quite make it home.

Khalil gets fatally shot by a white police officer while he was unarmed and simply cooperating, and Starr’s two worlds collide forever. People at Williamson constantly talk about him, unaware of the companionship he and Starr had in her early childhood. The people of the neighbourhood wouldn’t even talk to Starr about him, yet riots would break out on the streets. A movement.

The Hate U Give is a phenomenal punch to the gut of those who fight against Black Lives Matter. It really exemplifies what it’s like to be one of the only people of colour in a primarily white school with such raw emotion and in depth detail. “I’m cool by default because I’m one of the only black kids here.” or another great quote which I personally relate to on a whole new level, “Funny how it works with white kids though. It’s dope to be black until it’s hard to be black.” 

This book screams for social justice and equality for all, with an echo of the pride Starr has at the end of the book for her race. This book is all about teaching people that everyone deserves to live, that there is another side of the story that the media won’t tell, that no matter what there will always be that one person to drag you down but it doesn’t matter because you will have at least one more person to bring you all the way up to the clouds to get you away from the one person who’ll drag you down. It talks about how you will always be seen as a certain thing, like Star was seen as ‘the witness’ ‘the black kid’ ‘Big Mav’s daughter’ and many other things, until at the end she sees herself as a powerful young woman, with a hopeful future in activism, she is seen as Starr.

This novel is a must read for any teenager, young adult, adult, elder, absolutely anyone, no matter your race, sexuality, gender, or age, get your hands on this book as soon as you can!

Khalil, while talking about what Tupac has said and his current relevance, said, “Listen! The Hate U-the letter U-Give Little Infants F**ks Everybody, T-H-U-G  L-I-F-E. Meaning what society gives us as youth, it bites them in the ass when we wild out.” And if what we give kids in their youth affects how they act when they’re older and how they impact the world, then we should give them this book as soon as we can, or at least teach them even a sliver of what this book can teach others.

I’ve always said that us minorities can scream until our throats are bleeding and we can’t scream anymore, but those with the privilege can whisper and be heard better than us, and this book proves that in an insanely amazing way. This book will truly inspire you to take action, and you’ll be forever glad that you read it.

 

Trumps New Military Ban

featured image courtesy of Elite Daily 

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On July 26, 2017, President Donald Trump sent out a series of three messages on the social media platform Twitter. The three messages included new information about a certain group of people from the LGBTQ Community. They said, in order, “After consultation with my Generals and military experts, please be advised that the United States Government will not accept or allow……” “….Transgender individuals to serve in any capacity in the U.S. Military. Our military must be focused on decisive and overwhelming…..” “….victory and cannot be burdened with the tremendous medical costs and disruption that transgender in the military would entail. Thank you”

In writing these messages Trump stated that transgender individuals are burdens, which created an uprising on every social media platform. Hashtags were created and reused from old, forgotten about protests. Celebrities took to Instagram and Twitter to reblog pictures and captions that littered every corner of the internet. Celebrities/Politicians spoke their mind over Twitter.

Tom Perez tweeted “To the members of the transgender community: You are not a “burden.” Do not let this president shake you. We support you, we stand with you.” The tweet was liked more than 70,000 times and retweeted more than 35,000 times.

An old tweet from Ivanka Trump said, “I am proud to support my LGBTQ friends and the LGBTQ Americans who have made immense contributions to our society and economy.” That tweet was quoted by another twitter user James Cordon who, on July 26, said, “Hey Ivanka, James here. Hope all is good, quick question, can you… Erm… Call your dad and have a talk. X” That was in response to what her father had tweeted just earlier that day.

Former Vice President, Joe Biden, tweeted “Every patriotic American who is qualified to serve in our military should be able to serve. Full stop.”

Since Trump’s tweets people have stopped to wonder, ‘Is this constitutional?’ ‘what about those who are already in the military? will he really take 15,000 individuals out of the army?’ ‘isn’t he basically un-arming our military?’

However, none of these things can shake our community. Why? Because President Trump’s many actions carried out during his term have shown us, multiple times over, that when you silence and discriminate against one community, all others stand up to shout louder and stronger for those who can’t.

Angelina Jolie Diagnosed With Bell’s Palsy

featured image via Vanity Fair

Angelina Jolie ( 42) revealed in an interview with Vanity Fair that she had been diagnosed with Bell’s palsy,  ” a condition in which the muscles on one side of your face become weak or paralysed.  […] [affecting] one side of the face, Bell’s palsy leads one side of the face to droop or become stiff on the particular side.”

In an interview article with Vanity Fair,( click here to view Angelina’s cover story with Vanity Fair )  Jolie opened up about her ‘difficult’ divorce with her former partner of 10 years Brad Pitt, alongside insight on her current film she is working on ” First They Killed My Father”. The film is extremely personal and close to Jolie’s heart, yet has brought tension to the table due to a method used in order to cast children for the upcoming Netflix film.

It was mentioned by many sources that casting directors ” set up a game, rather disturbing in its realism [in which ] they put money on the table and asked the [children] to think of something they needed the money for, and then to snatch it away”

This method of casting in order to find children with ” raw emotion” has been deemed controversial by many different online media sources, and magazines.  Jolie was quoted by Vanity Fair regarding the casting where she mentioned, ” Srey Moch [the girl who was ultimately chosen for the part] was the only child [ who had ] started at the money for a very, very long time.  She was forced to give it back [ and became ] overwhelmed with emotion.  All these different things came flooding back”

Jolie later mentioned with a heavy heart that Srey Moch had wanted the money for the funeral of her grandfather who had recently passed.

A trailer tease for ” First They Killed My Father” can be viewed here.

 

Originally scheduled to come out Thursday, the Vanity Fair article was put on public display one day early,  leading to the break out of chaos and worry. An insider speaking to Page Six a celebrity news site mentioned, ” The company wants the magazines to promote each other’s stories that are newsworthy. However, releasing another publication’s piece prematurely ” especially a cover story ” would be considered ” a major screw-up”.

The above statement is an excerpt from a Fox News published article which can be found by clicking here.

 

WWII Couple- Together Forever

featured image via Scoopnest 

World War II was a time of misery, hatred, and death for many. Death counts reached millions and sorrows were never forgotten. For most, the pain of the war has passed, as they likely have as well. But for these orphans, pain, and tranquillity, has been renewed.

Marcelin and Francine Dumoulin left their home on the morning of August 15, 1942 to milk the family cows in a meadow, but sadly, they never returned home. The couple, who were parents of six children, are suspected to have fallen through a crevice of the Tsanfleuron Glacier in the Swiss Alps. Now, 75 years later, their bodies have been found, ‘mummified’, in the withdrawn glacier. A worker is said to have found them during standard maintenance. Found along with them was frozen belongings of theirs including backpacks, boots, watches, mess kits, etc. The bodies have since been airlifted away from the Alps so The Institute of Forensic Medicine can officially identify the bodies. Though DNA tests have not yet been done the remaining Dumoulin children(Marceline Udry-Domoulin, Monique Gautschy-Domoulin, the only known living) are convinced that the bodies found belong to their deceased parents.

Marceline said “I can say that after 75 years of waiting this news gives me a deep sense of calm. Now I know where my parents are” And Monique stated “(For the funeral) I will not put on black. I think white will be more appopriate. This represents hope, which I have never lost.”

Dear White People: Is Your Reverse Racism Really Racism?

 

featured image courtesy of tumblr

It’s realistic and honest to admit that not everyone holds the same views when it comes to any section of social justice. Some are more extreme than others, some more moderate, and this is generally considered acceptable and okay. As Americans, we can express our opinions without censorship of any kind, a freedom that can bring out both the best and the worst. An example of the latter would be the obnoxious, hateful opinions that bleed into public forum simply to generate a great deal of controversy. One of the biggest and possibly most distasteful disagreements is the concept of white racism, also referred to as reverse racism. It is, in most blatant terms, what happens when a white person is so engrossed in their privilege that when someone of color is treated with the same respect and equality as they are, they feel as if someone is attempting to knock them off of their racial pedestal. It’s this childish train of thought that has constrained the white American into belittling the struggles of those who face racism every breathing moment of their lives. It is the unicorn of social justice; we have people who cling stubbornly to the idea of it despite its lack of solid proof of it actually existing. 

Before you open your mouth to disagree with me, just let me say this; my intention is not to say that prejudice against white people cannot exist. It does, on occasion. Racial minorities are not immune to being racist against other racial minorities either, and evidence shows this. However, that is not the point I am trying to get across. White prejudice is real, I will admit it, but it is a trivial issue in comparison to authentic racism. Prejudice and racism are not interchangeable words, as they mean quite different things and carry quite different weights. Prejudice is a small aspect of racism, so one can innocently make this mistake. This is something to keep in mind if you, a white person, feel you are being handled in a manner you deem as “racist”, because you may be experiencing prejudice, not legitimate racism. If this crosses your mind, stop and ask yourself, “do I really understand what racism means?”.

If we want to have a much firmer grasp of this concept, we would have to look first at the concrete definition of racism itself. The most common definition, as quoted directly from the Merriam-Webster dictionary, is “prejudice, discrimination, or antagonism directed against someone of a different race based on the belief that one’s own race is superior”. If you still believe that this definition fits your idea of “reverse racism”, I urge you to look closer. You missed that it stated, “based on the belief that one’s own race is superior”. To briefly shift our focus from America to Europe, white history consists of a multitude of instances where Europeans conquered native people, such as those in North America and Africa, and committed acts of genocide and violence with the flimsy excuse that they were deemed uncivilized, and, to shift back to our United States of America,  we also have the glaring cases of African slavery deeply ingrained in our American history; this is racism in its most basic, primitive form. Yet it is also critical to mention that this isn’t the entire assemblage of what racism really means. There are countless aspects of it; it is not a simple concept that can be understood by definition alone. We have systematic, economic, social, and historical prospects to take into account.

It’s these elements that shape the futility of white racism. A white person does not have to struggle to get work because of their race, or have to worry about facing racial violence while on the street, or worry about being pulled over and facing brutality at the hands of a racist policeman, or worry about being randomly selected at an airport and being inhumanely searched, or facing an unfair sentence at trial based on a false accusation because of their skin color. Every day you hear tragedy after tragedy of racial violence, but very few of these victims are white. You cannot discuss racism without bringing these components on the table.

To accompany this idea of reverse racism, we have these same white voices that gripe over their assumed racism also gripes over the Black Lives Matter movement and Black History Month and other similar concepts. What they don’t understand is that the white community doesn’t need a month or a movement to “celebrate” its alleged greatness; the dominant anecdote you hear, whether it is historical or fictional, is routinely white. Our history books are drenched in it, our TV shows and movies soaked in it, our books and magazines submerged in it; America bares its whiteness so vigorously, it leaves the colors behind. This why people of color celebrate when one of their own makes a modeling career, or appears in a film, or is written inside of a fictional story because this is an anomaly in our whitewashed America. White people don’t need a group to protest against violence because there is no continuous string of slaughter against them for being white. They own white privilege with their tone of skin, one that not any other race can say the same too.

Here is the bottom line; white racism cannot exist because racism is rooted in oppression and hate-filled racial intolerance, a situation that white people have historically never been up against. White people have been the oppressors and the ones in power. Theoretical “racism against whites” does not hold the same weight as the genocides, sexual violence, and the manipulative behavior that were exercised throughout the imperial ages of Europe and later the United States by white settlers and imperialists. Racism against white people cannot exist because white privilege exists. This is their protection badge, their get out of jail free card that those of color cannot obtain because our system tips itself towards white privilege time and time again. There is a whopping 48.4% of hate crimes committed in 2015 where the perpetrator was white, and that number has only continued to increase dramatically, with not a single finger lifted to fix it. The KKK doesn’t exist for shits and giggles; it is in itself the personification of white racism, with its website open for the public to access at its leisure. White people have power, and it is needlessly abused. People who use their whiteness for activism and to raise the voices of those who have been silenced again and again should be a radiant standard of how to use privilege, instead of to tear others down. If you are going to take anything away from this, please let it be this; your power is a privilege of its own, and I advise you to use it for the good of others for their sake and, in a way, your own. Being white doesn’t make you a wicked person, being a racist person does.

 

Kendall and Kylie Jenner: the t-shirt drama.

Kendall and Kylie Jenner released new Merchandise on the ___ of June 2017 for their Kendall + Kylie brand.
The new merch consisted of t-shirts that had iconic artists on them, like Ozzy Osbourne, Tupac and the doors, amongst others…. and on top of the images of the artists the shirts had the faces of both sisters superimposed.
But the pictures used on the merch were trademarked, which means they can’t be used unless you ask for permission. There would be no bad in this if the sisters had asked for permission to use the trademarked pictures that are printed on the shirts. But they didn’t. And in order to use tradermarked images people need the consent from the owners and they did not ask for it.
The artists and their families, when warned about this episode, were quick to express their feelings via Twitter:

After the backlash the Merchandise was taken off sale since the young Jenners were being threatened with lawsuits. To apologize for the situation, both girls published the same statement on their Twitter accounts:

kylie

 

 

Friday, Michael Miller filed a copyright infringement lawsuit due to the fact that the sisters did not ask for his permission to use the two pictures that he took of Shakur that are stamped on the shirts and is demanding receipt of any profits they made off the shirts.
Miller said declared he never gave permission for his work to be used in this Merchandise and “is demanding receipt of any profits they made off the shirts”.
As an answer to Michael Miller’s lawsuit, a representative for the brand Kendall + Kylie, Todd Wilson has said that the lawsuit is “absurd and misguided”, since even though the sisters approved the design, they aren’t the ones responsible for the technical details and issues of legality.The statement released from the brand says that the shirts with Tupac’s images were “obtained from a company that had a valid license to sell them”. Besides, the statement declares Miller’s lawsuit as “baseless”: released a statement saying that the shirts with Tupac’s image were “obtained from a company that had a valid license to sell them”. Besides, the statement declares Miller’s lawsuit “baseless”.
“The allegations made are completely false and the lawsuit is baseless. There has been no infringement or violation of anyone’s rights.”

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Each shirt was $125, but only two of them were sold, says LOS ANGELES, Kendall and Kylie’s fashion label.
Concurrently, these controversial shirts served as inspiration for Arcade Fire’s recent merch, which is composed by a picture of Kendall and the band’s logo superimposed.
Arcade Fire are donating the profit from their Merchandise to Partners in Health, which is a non-profit organisation that works to improve the health of poor and marginalised people across the world.
Seems like this messy situation is far from over and that the famous sisters are going to have to deal with some consequences.
What do you think about all of this? Which side are you on? Do you think that the Merchandise was disrespectful? Do you think Kendall and Kylie even thought about the consequences their act was going to have?
Leave your opinions down below!

 

The 5 Best Songs Off Of Halsey’s Hopeless Fountain Kingdom

On June 2nd, 2017, alt-pop singer Ashely Nicollette Frangipane (better known as Halsey) released her highly anticipated sophomore album Hopeless Fountain Kingdom. HFK is a concept album based on the story of Romeo and Juliet. Sound-wise, HFK differentiates from Halsey’s previous album Badlands in the sense that it sounds much more R&B influenced than rock, though Halsey still considers herself an alternative artist. Without further ado, here are my top five favorite songs from Halsey’s sophomore record Hopeless Fountain Kingdom.

5. Sorry

Serving as one of few ballads on the album, “Sorry” is about unrequited love, except in this scenario Halsey is the one who doesn’t feel the same about someone who seemingly loves her.“Someone will love you, but someone isn’t me.” she sings vulnerable over a piano in the post-chorus. “Sorry” is definitely a tear-jerker, and really showcases Halsey’s vocal skills.

4. Walls Could Talk

Upon first listen, this is the song that immediately stuck out to me. Sound-wise, “Walls Could Talk” is very reminiscent of Maroon 5’s early days. “And I’m thinking, “Damn, if these walls could talk” Well, they’d be like “Shit is crazy, right? That ain’t your baby no more”” she sings in the chorus. My only complaint about this song is that I wish it was longer, as it clocks in at only one minute and forty-two seconds.

3. Bad At Love

On this track, Halsey goes through the history of her previous relationships and details what went wrong with each of them. She ultimately comes to the conclusion that she is bad at love and relationships in general. “I’m bad at love but you can’t blame me for tryin’, you know I’d be lyin’ sayin’ you were the one that could finally fix me. Lookin’ at my history I’m bad at love.” she belts in the chorus. This track is definitely one of the more upbeat R&B-esque moments on the record.

2. 100 Letters

“100 Letters” is a pop ballad in which Halsey sings of a previous relationship where she tried to make things work with her partner and ultimately failed. The lyrics are inspired heavily by Romeo and Juliet in the sense she felt like she was living it. “I’m going through this relationship where I feel like a version of myself and a version of himself are dying for the sake of wanting to make our love work,” she said of the song. “100 Letters” has a painstakingly relatable chorus in which Halsey sings “And now I can’t stop thinking that I can’t stop thinking that I almost gave you everything. And now the whole thing’s finished and I can’t stop wishing that I never gave you anything.”, something that everyone who’s ever gone through a breakup can relate to.

Alone

“Alone” was instantly my favorite the first time I listened, and has remained my #1 ever since. “Alone” is about someone’s desire to meet you, but insisting that once they do they’ll regret it. “I know you’re dying to meet me, but I can just tell you this. Baby, as soon as you meet me, you’ll wish that you never did.” she croons in the chorus. What makes “Alone” so special to me is the upbeat, infectious, sound the song carries. It is definitely one of the most danceable tracks on the record and is definitely sure to uplift your mood, just by the way it sounds.

Overall, Hopeless Fountain Kingdom is a stellar album. Halsey’s vision for the record really shines through, and even though it is a concept album it isn’t gimmicky. Each song has it’s own flair but still ties into one another very nicely and cohesively. If you haven’t yet, I highly recommend you check out Halsey’s Hopeless Fountain Kingdom.